Living with M.S.

"Living with M.S. is sort of like training for a long race. The harder you try, and the longer you keep at it, the stronger you become.
Eventually, looking back, you may be amazed at the power you possessed, even when you had no idea it was within your reach." (Linda Ann Nickerson)

Saturday

Zooming: Describing multiple sclerosis from A to Z




At this moment, multiple sclerosis cannot be cured. Sure, various treatments show promise for slowing the progression of this chronic neurological condition. Various experts claim some medications can minimize the frequency of MS exacerbations, flare-ups, and relapses (which may or may not all be the same thing, depending upon whom you ask). 



But a total remedy, which stops MS in its tracks, is not yet available. Also, no current solution seems to be able to reverse existing damage from this disease. Brain and spinal lesions are likely to linger, at least until someone comes up with a way to treat them.

No one even seems to be able to pinpoint exactly what causes MS. Theories abound – from childhood illnesses to head injuries to circulatory system issues to rogue viruses to autoimmune problems to genetics to diet and nutrition to all sorts of other possibilities.

Still, science marches on.

That’s where the zooming comes in.

Medical research is showing tremendous promise for answering multiple sclerosis and other yet-incurable diseases. Do we dare hope the MS MonSter may be crushed during our lifetimes? Maybe someday, multiple sclerosis will be ancient history.

Related item/s:



Image/s:
April A to Z Challenge 2016 logo – fair use
 Adapted from public domain artwork

Feel free to follow on Google Plus and Twitter.  You are invited to join the Kicking MS to the Curb page on Facebook and the Making the Most of MS board on Pinterest as well.

Friday

Yucky: Describing multiple sclerosis from A to Z



Living with multiple sclerosis requires an element of spunk and spirit. You might say a person becomes downright plucky, dealing with a chronic medical condition that is absolutely yucky.

What does “yucky” even mean?

It’s an example of onomatopoeia, which is any word that looks and sounds like what it means. We say something is yucky when we find it cruddy, disagreeable, discomforting, disgusting, distasteful, foul, gross, icky, nasty, offensive, repugnant, rotten, and unpleasant.



That pretty much describes multiple sclerosis.

Any or all of those words fit, especially during MS’ worst moments. And that’s not just when the MonSter disrupts an MS warrior’s basic bodily functions, interfering even with personal hygiene. (OK, that’s really yucky!) And that doesn’t happen to all of us.

This thing called MS is yucky because it scars up our brains. It makes our heads spin. It makes our extremities (and other parts) randomly tingle, twitch, sting, burn, or go absolutely numb. It’s a senseless sick (and still incurable) condition that can make us walk drunkenly without drinking, battle motion sickness while staying still, and trip over things that aren’t even there.

That’s pretty yucky. Good thing we’re plucky, ‘cause we’re not getting stucky by this MonStrous schmucky.

Related item/s:



Image/s:
April A to Z Challenge 2016 logo – fair use
 Adapted from public domain artwork

Feel free to follow on Google Plus and Twitter.  You are invited to join the Kicking MS to the Curb page on Facebook and the Making the Most of MS board on Pinterest as well.

Thursday

eXperience: Describing multiple sclerosis from A to Z




Multiple sclerosis brings a host of strange and soul-stretching experiences, from the initial diagnosis through every symptomatic episode. Sometimes we struggle to accept and cope and manage whatever the MS MonSter throws at us. Occasionally we even learn from such circumstances.

MS is eXperience.



Note: I understand that “experience” doesn’t exactly start with an “X.” But we’re getting to the end of the April A to Z Challenge, and my brain is a little exhausted. Hey, I have a doctor’s excuse for that – just like any MSer.


Every MS first can feel like a whopper, especially when we don’t recognize or understand what is happening to us. A crippling fatigue, dizziness, inability to walk, sudden blindness, and other MS manifestations can throw us for a loop. If these symptoms subside, we might chalk them up to experience. Next time, we can sort of guess what’s going on. Power over the MS MonSter can take practice.

Each MS exacerbation becomes an exhausting experience in and of itself. That’s no exaggeration. No exam can tell us how long the relapse or flare-up will last. It’s exceedingly exasperating. And when it ends, we can be exceptionally excited or even exuberant. It’s uncanny, but it’s real.

When the cloud lifts, we might think, “Gee, is this how the rest of the world feels all the time?”

Not the rest of the world. Just people who don’t live with chronic illnesses. Not the exceptions like us, who are all gaining experience.

“People grow through experience, if they meet life honestly and courageously,” said American First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962). “This is how character is built.”

Brick by brick, flare-up by flare-up, and symptom by symptom. And yes, we are most certainly characters. And, as Forrest Gump said, “That’s all I have to say about that.”




Image/s:
April A to Z Challenge 2016 logo – fair use
 Adapted from public domain artwork

Feel free to follow on Google Plus and Twitter.  You are invited to join the Kicking MS to the Curb page on Facebook and the Making the Most of MS board on Pinterest as well.
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