Living with M.S.

"Living with M.S. is sort of like training for a long race. The harder you try, and the longer you keep at it, the stronger you become.
Eventually, looking back, you may be amazed at the power you possessed, even when you had no idea it was within your reach." (Linda Ann Nickerson)

Wednesday

Can this new MS drug reverse demyelination?



Could this be a medical breakthrough for treating multiple sclerosis? MSers may surely hope this is a step in the right direction.

Neurology, Science Daily and other research journals are reporting that a new experimental MS treatment is looking promising as a possible means of reversing nerve demyelination. That’s the primary problem of MS.

Here’s the news, as it has just been released:

MINNEAPOLIS – A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe and tolerable in phase I clinical trials, according to a study published August 27, 2014, in Neurology® Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, published by the American Academy of Neurology


The phase I studies were the first to test the drug candidate in humans. Studies with animals showed that the drug, which is called anti-LINGO-1, or BIIB033, may be able to reverse the demyelination of the nerves. Anti-LINGO-1 blocks LINGO-1, a central nervous system protein that prevents myelination.


Current treatments for MS work to reduce new damage to the brain, but do not repair new or past damage. In MS, the body’s immune system begins to attack the myelin that acts as insulation around the nerves in the central nervous system. This makes it more difficult for the nerves to send messages to and from the brain and spinal cord.


In the study, 72 healthy people without MS and 47 people with either relapsing-remitting MS or secondary progressive MS were given the drug or a placebo. The healthy participants received either a placebo or one dose of the drug by an injection. The people with MS received either placebo or two doses of the drug two weeks apart. In both groups, participants received varying amounts of the drug, ranging from 0.1 mg/kg to 100 mg/kg. 

The occurrence of side effects was similar for people who received the drug and those who received the placebo. Most side effects were mild to moderate and were not related to the drug. Side effects included headaches, upper respiratory infections and urinary tract infections. There were no serious side effects or deaths. 


There were no significant changes in vital signs, EKGs or other safety tests of the drug. Doses of 10 mg/kg and higher resulted in concentrations of the drug in the blood that were similar to or higher than the concentration that was associated with 90 percent of the maximum remyelination effect in studies with rats. 


“With these results we have been able to start phase II studies to see whether this drug can actually repair the lost myelin in humans and have any effect on restoring physical and cognitive function and improving disability,” said study author Diego Cadavid, MD, of Biogen Idec in Cambridge, Mass., which developed the drug. 


Cadavid is a member of the American Academy of Neurology. The study was supported by Biogen Idec. Learn more about multiple sclerosis at AAN.com/patients.




The actual chemistry of the drug and its action on the body has not been published at this point. However, MSers and those who care for them are watching and waiting for additional reports on the safety, efficacy, and potential governmental approval of this new medication for MS.
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